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Topic: Netflix US runs 4K HEVC/H.265 encoded video streams (production)

All of this being said, it is oriented on new TV's and smart boxes with build in hardware decoders. HEVC/H.265 bitrate of these streams around 15 Mbps, quality is superior to HD Netflix (1080p), but some Blu-ray titles on my Pioneer BDP-62F (in eu its BDP-450) still offer a cleaner image.
Still this my subjective opinion and with my LG 49UB8500 4K TV (@$1500 US), I feel quality is really amazing.
Knowing how big Netflix is on a streaming market in US, hardware decoders for HEVC/H.265 will be widespread before the end of the year.
I am not able to locate any details on internal mechanics of this decoders, but there is strong possibility that it can be used in home theater environment.
Before I paid ignorance to x265 due to lack of real progress compared to x264 options.

2 (edited by mogobime 2014-06-20 22:58:36)

Re: Netflix US runs 4K HEVC/H.265 encoded video streams (production)

If you can see the difference between 4K and 1080p on a 50" TV you have eagles eyes or you're sitting directly in front of it.
The human eye can differ points with a size of 1mm at a normal viewing distance of 3-6m.

-> Therefore you need a TV with more than 1920mm (1.92m!!!) width or more than 80" diagonal to see a difference between 1080p and 4K at normal viewing distance.
For me 4K is a pure marketing thing to help the industry sell new TV's.
The only benefit I see is for interlaced 3D...

It was the same with full HD those days: Useless below 55" diagonal...

The quality improvement you recognize is more to the used bitrate, encoding settings or codec quality than resolution.

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Re: Netflix US runs 4K HEVC/H.265 encoded video streams (production)

mogobime wrote:

If you can see the difference between 4K and 1080p on a 50" TV you have eagles eyes or you're sitting directly in front of it.
The human eye can differ points with a size of 1mm at a normal viewing distance of 3-6m.

-> Therefore you need a TV with more than 1920mm (1.92m!!!) width or more than 80" diagonal to see a difference between 1080p and 4K at normal viewing distance.
For me 4K is a pure marketing thing to help the industry sell new TV's.
The only benefit I see is for interlaced 3D...

It was the same with full HD those days: Useless below 55" diagonal...

The quality improvement you recognize is more to the used bitrate, encoding settings or codec quality than resolution.

I suggest for you to do that; theory is one thing, practice is another (As I mentioned I have 4K TV 49" and 1080p projector 150" screen, both have its uses)
D.

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Re: Netflix US runs 4K HEVC/H.265 encoded video streams (production)

Before we start a discussion about whether someone has 'eagle eyes' or not, here's a interesting read: http://carltonbale.com/1080p-does-matter/